Davis House

Originally the residence of entrepreneur James T. Davis, this mansion has many interesting features, including a dining room that is a replica of a room in the Vatican, an Italian Renaissance style library, and its own chapel on the second floor.

Davis House (3654 promenade Sir William Osler)

In 1909, James T. Davis, a Square Mile entrepreneur, commissioned the renowned Canadian architects Edward and William Maxwell to design a mansion suitable for a man of his stature. The result was an Elizabethan Tudor style edifice of red brick on Drummond Street. This building, which features Dutch dormer windows, high gables, and steep roofs, has many interesting features, including a dining room that is a replica of a room in the Vatican, an Italian Renaissance style library, and its own chapel on the second floor.

Comments on “Davis House”

  • Paul Frazer

    McGill has a rich heritage of architecture. The exteriors are very interesting and I would suggest that a series of photos of selected aspects of the interiors would be well received by your readers. With the approach of the 200th anniversary is there a possibility of producing a book curated by the School of Architecture that would speak not only to the campus heritage in architecture but also speak to the history of the School of Architecture?
    On another note, I believe McGill has a broad and deep visual arts collection. Specific pieces would be welcome as part of your Arts and Literature section in the Reporter.

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